Hello from the UK

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Hello from the UK

garza
Hi

I am a "Brit" and really like this site and what it is trying to do, I am a big fan of the US and was wondering what the term for that is, I would be happy to chat on all things British

Gaz
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Re: Hello from the UK

RickyCoventry
Same here mate, I bet a load of people will be over after the articul on  the BBC sit.

If anyone wants any british music, t.v or films recomended, drop me a line.
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Re: Hello from the UK

MSinclair
A Brit?  Finish the word will you?

Jokes aside.  I have to say I prefer the term English, being an Englishman.  Although much like many Englishman - I have Irish/Welsh and of course Scots in my blood - the latter of which gave me my surname - Sinclair.  Which is actually Norman and not from the UK at all.  I shall leave you to ponder over that...

What a wonderful website.  I have to say I am little shocked one of its ilk actually exists.  I have enjoyed my visit though and I shall endeavour to return.

Many thanks.





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Re: Hello from the UK

garza
I was hoping that more americans would reply, I agree a good many brits will look at the site after the article.

I would also designate myself as English but that is not possible in these pc laden times

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Re: Hello from the UK

Zella
Administrator
In reply to this post by garza
Dear Gaz, I am happy that you like my website and pleased that you have taken the time to post a comment.  I've heard many people ask whether a term for "lovers of the U.S." exists--i.e., a term comparable to "Anglophile."  Sadly, there is not.  Certainly, we can create a word....but even if we do, until or unless it gains common usage and gets included in dictionaries....well, it's just not *real,* is it?  (Americans got the short end of the stick on that one!)  At any rate, I'm glad you like my country--for I certainly like yours!
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Re: Hello from the UK

Zella
Administrator
In reply to this post by garza
It's true--I try to accommodate all on my website, so I tend to use the more general term "Brit" a lot.  I hope my kind readers understand the tightrope I walk!
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Re: Hello from the UK

Zella
Administrator
In reply to this post by MSinclair
MSinclair, I shall be happy to call you an Englishman anytime!  Thank you for visiting my website, and I hope you will return!
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Re: Hello from the UK

MSinclair
Zella, hi

Thanks for taking the time to reply.

I have been thinking about the query in the original post:  What would one call an equivalent to anglophile who appreciates the culture of the USA and the lack of a word for it.

I'm a great lover of the English language and how adaptable it is. So for a bit of fun I asked my young daughter last night and she came up with....

Americanophile.   (Bless)

I did point out to her that America is not just the USA.  It’s a huge continent.  But she was adamant and seemed rather pleased with herself.

I wasn’t going to argue with a happy child.
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Re: Hello from the UK

postrophe


"Americanophile, n. and adj." - Word of the Day from the OED


Etymology: < American adj. + -o- connective + -phile comb. form, perhaps after Anglophile n., Francophile n., etc. Compare earlier Americanophobia n. A. n. A person who loves or admires the United States or its culture.

1894 N.-Y. Times 26 Feb. 3/2 He was transformed from a bibliophile into an Americanophile.

1939 Sunday Times-Signal(Zanesville, Ohio) 17 Sept. i. 4/6 The Association‥is composed of French Americanophiles and American Francophiles.

1972 C. Barnett Collapse Brit. Power v. 346 A sentimental Americanophile whose pro-American sentiments were shared by his colleagues.

2000 Publishers Weekly 4 Sept. 54/2 An Americanophile who has put America into more than one of his own novels.. adj. Characterized by love of or admiration for the United States or its culture.

1919 N.Y. Times 12 Oct. 6/1 The‥British view of our country and our people‥[is] undoubtedly Americanophile.

1942 Dunkirk (N.Y. )Evening Observer 12 Oct. 16/4 The president of Chile, whose sincere Americanophile disposition‥[is] the same as his government's.

1979 Rev. Politics 41 495 The existence of well-defined Americanophile groups is not often immediately evident.

2003 Maclean's (Electronic ed.) 21 Apr. 4 This is when Canada's national magazine should defend Canada and not be Americanophile sycophants.

Seems your little one is onto something
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Re: Hello from the UK

Michelle
In reply to this post by RickyCoventry
Hi. I live here in the states, and love all things British! I'd love to chat sometime! :)
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Re: Hello from the UK

Spotted Dick
In reply to this post by garza
Ok, that's not really my name. :-)  But it makes me laugh every time i see it in a can.  We have a special British aisle in our local grocery store.  LOVE IT!  I can't wait to visit england someday.  I got hooked on all things British after watching The Tudors.  Then i started reading books about the Tudor era, and the Wars of the Roses, the Plantagenets, etc etc.  SO INTERESTING!
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Re: Hello from the UK

Spotted Dick
In reply to this post by MSinclair
do you know of any other good british chat rooms/web sites?  thanks
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Re: Hello from the UK

Zella
Administrator
In reply to this post by Michelle
Welcome, Michelle!  Sounds like you--like most of the rest of us--are stricken with Anglophilia!  You should feel at home!  
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Re: Hello from the UK

Zella
Administrator
In reply to this post by Spotted Dick
Dear Spotted Dick: Your name is popular with all of us Anglophiles!  I'm happy you have easy access to British goods--not all Anglophiles do.
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Re: Hello from the UK

Zella
Administrator
In reply to this post by Spotted Dick
Spotted Dick: This is the very best one!  ;)
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Re: Hello from the UK

Mark
In reply to this post by garza
I'm an American. I just found this site and don't know where to start, but I would love to discuss the similarities and differences between the cultures and languages of Blighty and the States.

Mark
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Re: Hello from the UK

Mark
In reply to this post by garza
The education systems in the US and in the UK are very different and I'm only beginning to get a handle on it.

What are GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education) exams?

What are "A levels"?
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Re: Hello from the UK

Mark
In reply to this post by Zella
I use the word "Brit" as well. I like the term. But I'm an American. Are there British that take offence to it?
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Re: Hello from the UK

Mark
In reply to this post by garza
What do the British call a "cookie jar" -- a biscuit bin?
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Re: Hello from the UK

Mark
In reply to this post by Spotted Dick
Obviously you like England. If you like reading history, you might like Ian Mortimer's book The Time Traveler's Guide to Medieval England. It's the best approach to history I've ever seen.
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